4 Roof Styles to Consider When Building a Home

Roof styles vary through time and across regions, and learning about your many roofing options can help you design the new structure you plan on calling home.

That’s the beauty of investing in a new build — you can choose the roof style that you want.

Here are four choices to consider:

Gable Roof

Gable Roof

The gable roof is perhaps the most popular and classic option out of all the various designs. A gable roof is constructed of two slopes that meet at a center ridge, making a triangle shape. The pitch in this design provides functionality — precipitation runs off easily. In addition, the gable provides extra attic space, which can either be finished to add living space or used for additional storage.

Since this type is straightforward to construct and easier to tile or shingle, it is one of the most affordable roof styles you can choose. Typically, gable roofs are adorned with asphalt shingles, but any roofing material can be used. To give it a unique touch of character, dormers can be added too.

Hip Roof

Hip Roof

A hip roof is also popular from among the many roof styles, with four slopes that meet along a ridge. This style is more stable than a gable since it withstands strong winds better, but it still provides for easy precipitation runoff. However, since it does require more building materials to construct, it’s typically more expensive to build.

Flat Roof

Flat Roof

Looking for modern roof styles for a non-traditional home? A flat roof could provide the look you want. Since they don’t have a steep pitch, flat roofs are easy to build. However, since there is no pitch, it’s also essential to install a protective rubber underlayment to keep out water. Flat roofs require more maintenance than other types of roofs because leaks must be addressed quickly, so regular monitoring is recommended.

Gambrel Roof

Gambrel Roof

The gambrel style is usually seen on barns, but using it for residential construction is an attractive option too. The front and back have two different slopes. The lower slope is steep, almost vertical, and the upper slope has much less of a pitch. The roof seems to form a curve around the home’s structure, and this provides plenty of additional living space. Adding windows adds light to the upper stories.

A gambrel is not always recommended for regions that get heavy snow, since the design is not the top option for withstanding pressure, and it should be inspected for leaks on a regular basis. However, its straightforward design makes it simple and affordable to build.

Get a free estimate from Knockout Roofing, learn more about various roof styles and work with a team that can bring your dream home — particularly the roof — to life.